Health-conscious Linux users: Tell FitBit you’d like Linux support!

Posted in Geek Stuff by dave on October 5, 2009 1 Comment

The blogs here have been thin of late, and an upcoming post should explain why – there have been a lot of changes in my life recently, and I’m eager to share the before-and-afters with you. Just as soon as I have time to write them down!

fitbit-logo

In the mean time, I’d like to point your attention to a new product that was featured today on Springwise … the FitBit is a tiny new wearable personal activity logger that’s capable of tracking (using inertial sensors) the steps you take, calories you burn, and activity you enjoy throughout the day. The collected data can be displayed right on the device (using a sexy built-in OLED display) or uploaded to the FitBit web app for interpretation and display.

fitbitproduct

I think the FitBit product is phenomenal, as is the way FitBit-the-company has brought it to market: They’ve blogged extensively about the entire product development process, and all the cool things – and hiccups – they did and experienced along the way. Moreover, the product pushes all the right buttons for me – it’s simple to operate, unobtrusive, visually-attractive and well-designed.

There is, however, a little fly in the ointment – the fine folks at FitBit haven’t provided a Linux client, and a quick site-specific Google Search of fitbit.com reveals nary a clue as to when or if they might release one. The Linux community has done it before, and I believe it’s time to do it again: we need to let the folks at FitBit know that the Linux userbase is worth supporting! So please – if you’re a Linux user who’s even remotely interested in health and fitness, leave a pleasant comment on the FitBit blog, kindly requesting Linux support.

As a runner and cyclist – and someone who’s hopelessly dependent on the anti-depressant effects of physical exercise for my very sanity – I’m looking forward to buying and trying a FitBit. No, I don’t need it. Nor do I believe gadgetry is a necessary component of a fitness plan – the only thing truly necessary for most people to live healthily is a strong enough desire to do so. But I do believe that tools like the FitBit, or many of the myriad other physiologically- and medically-sound gadgets available to enhance well-being can be great additions to one’s arsenal.

Comments
  • Beth Whitmire:

    I’m anxiously looking forward to receiving my Fitbit — I’m a recent orderer, not a preorder. I just wanted to point out that though you will certainly find the Fitbit helpful to you as a runner, using it for cycling is just a bit more complicated. The Fitbit isn’t designed to track cycling, so as I understand it, you need to attribute that time to cycling on the Fitbit website, and then the appropriate adjustment to your calorie burn is applied.

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